We have a long track record of initiating and conducting applied research on business issues of relevance to senior executives. The outcomes of our research nourish our conversations with executives and stimulate intelligent debate between executives.

Below are examples of recent publications that can be ordered or downloaded.

 

Debates about centralization vs. decentralization are often fraught with emotion and protectiveness. On the one hand, business responsiveness calls for decentralization of decision-making to the operating units. On the other hand, concerns about business reliability, efficiency and perennity may pull the other way. The article presents a proven way of thinking to help rationalize that debate.

Read the article published in the Harvard Business Review.

A matrix is a tool to strengthen lateral coordination. When deployed sparingly and wisely, a matrix can improve the quality and speed of decision-making without obfuscating accountability. The article briefly describes five guidelines for doing so. The goal is to gain enough trust in the matrix to let it do its work, sensing the matrix is there without noticing it.

Read the article published in the Harvard Business Review.

 

When economic growth is slow and investments costs are rising, even cash-rich companies understandably tend to put a brake on the addition or renewal of production capacity. Yet by doing so, they risk lagging behind competitors when good times return. The article presents seven alternative asset ownership & operation models to escape from this dilemma.

Read the article published in the Harvard Business Review.

 

Stated values at most companies fail to have much of an impact: they don't boost performance, they don't set the company apart, and they don't steer employee behavior. That is because they are defined as generic, non-negotiable points of perfection. The article presents a novel approach that leads to values that do reveal and reinforce the company's distinct and desired culture.

Read the article published in Strategy & Leadership.

An organization design is never perfect – but at some point you've got to decide and go for the "least bad" design. Afterwards you continually add checks and balances to make up for the imperfections, until your organization gets completely unwieldy and triggers a wholesale redesign. The article presents guidelines for explaining and managing this inescapable cycle, and thus preventing cynicism about "yet another organization change".

Read the article published in Strategy & Leadership.

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